OUR TECHNOLOGY

The energy landscape of tomorrow

The Compact Molten Salt Reactor will complement other sustainable energy sources

The introduction of intermittent renewables into our electricity grids is causing a shift away from centralised networks based around high-emission power plants to a distributed grid of variable renewables. 

For this new model to be sustainable, variable energy sources like wind and solar need to be complemented with stable sources such as nuclear energy.

Our Power Barge can produce energy where and when it is needed, supporting variable renewables on windless, cloudy days. 

Today

Tomorrow

Project timeline

Our path to commercialization

Initial modeling

2015

Design & verification

2020

Commercial prototypes

2024

2026

Power Barge

serial production

2023

Detailed design & validation

A versatile energy source

Providing electricity is just one of many capabilities of the CMSR

Industry applications

Electricity

production

Seawater

desalination

District

heating

The Power Barge

in operation

The Power Barge will be able to deliver up to 800 MW of electricity as well as clean water from desalination, and district heating/cooling.

Additionally, the outlet temperature of the reactor is high enough to efficiently produce carbon-neutral hydrogen, synthetic fuels and fertilizers. 

This means that the Power Barge can make an important contribution to the transition towards a prosperous and emission-free society.

Sustainable technology

We are designing the CMSR to be one of the most sustainable sources of energy in the world

1

ECONOMIC SUSTAINABILITY

The CMSR has excellent market fit, low upfront costs and fast deployment time. This drastically reduces financial risk and out-competes fossil fuels on free market terms.

2

SOCIAL

SUSTAINABILITY

In order to achieve a sustainable society, the world needs reliable and abundant energy sources that will function in both existing and emergent energy infrastructures.

3

ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY

The CMSR emits no  greenhouse gases while operating and has the lowest resource use of any energy technology.  ​

What about

safety and waste?

Addressing the elephant in the room

In the CMSR, the fuel is mixed into a molten fluoride salt which also acts as the coolant. This provides significant safety benefits.

If the fuel salt should ever come into contact with the atmosphere, it will simply cool down and turn into solid rock, containing all the radioactive material within itself.

Unlike conventional nuclear, our reactor will operate at near-atmospheric pressures eliminating a wide range of accident scenarios.

Upon termination of the 12-year fuel cycle, the fuel is returned to the supplier where the short-lived fission products are separated and sent to storage.

Since the fuel is chemically stable and the fission products are short-lived, this waste is radiologically similar to radioactive hospital waste and can be handled using conventional methods.

The remaining fuel salt will be mixed into new CMSR fuel at the fuel supplying facility.
In this way the challenges of long-term storage will be avoided in the future.

THE GOAL FOR SEABORG IS TO REUSE OUR OWN WASTE WITH THE AMBITION TO CLOSE OUR FUEL CYCLE

Energy

CMSR fuel

Long-lived waste

Short-lived waste

The CMSR core